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The Importance of Coming Out of Hiding

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The pain we feel as parents when our children are going through tough times is not easily explained. The human bond we have with our child is something that can never be broken, even when our child is not with us. Parent’s with an incarcerated child, experience so many issues from visitation, to money on books, to emotional sadness, grief, depression, shame, guilt, and so much more. It can leave us feeling all alone and in despair. It is important to talk to someone who fully understands the grief and struggle that we battle daily.

This is primarily why I created Parents With Incarcerated Children– to be that place where you won’t be alone in your struggle and you can learn, share resources, talk about how you feel, and the things that you experience with those that have been or are going through the same thing as you.

There are many support groups available that one can go to for issues that they are dealing with in life. These groups unite struggling souls and provide them the strength to overcome any negative feelings and aid in their quest to fight the urge to overcome damaging behaviors.

Human interaction is critical during turbulent times. The need for human interaction is a strong impulse and can empower us with the strength we need to overcome. For many, this strength can’t come from ourselves alone. Parents With Incarcerated Children is helping to accomplish this by providing a place where parents with children incarcerated can go to find the support they need and gather the strength they need to continue their daily lives while avoiding the pitfalls that can occur when these feelings and issues are left to flourish without attention.

Please share below the negative feeling that is hindering you the most so I can provide you with some specific strategies that can help…

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Are You Emotionally Healthy?

I know what you’re thinking—your child is incarcerated and I just asked if you are emotionally healthy… “Of course I’m not. At this point I’m not even sure what that looks like.”

I get it. When my daughter went to jail my emotions were all over the place, from angry, to confused, to scared and everything in between. It’s completely normal and understandable. AND it doesn’t have to stay this way. In fact, our emotions, even when seemingly out of control, help us to take action and survive.

Research shows that people who are emotionally healthy are in control of their emotions and behavior, are able to handle life’s challenges, and recover from setbacks. So how exactly do you improve your emotional health after a blow as devastating as losing your child to the incarceration system?

The first step is to identify the current level of your emotional health. We found this great FREE online quiz that not only tells you where your emotions are now, it also provides some powerful tips and recommendation on how to move forward. CLICK HERE to start the quiz.

In the PWIC community we’re here to support and uplift one another and help hold each other accountable. After you get your results I encourage you to comment below and let us know one thing you plan to do this week to improve your emotional health. If you feel stuck, it’s ok to post that too and I’m sure another parent will gladly pop in with some ideas that may help.

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Discussion

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Coping Skills

How To Cope With A Loved One In Prison

Cope? You mean I should actually be able to COPE while my child is in jail? This statement will likely evoke a similar response from any parent who has ever looked for help after their child has been incarcerated.

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Emotional Health

Improving Your Emotional Health

Unless we as parents work diligently at staying emotionally healthy we won’t be any good for our children or ourselves during their incarceration, and more importantly when they are released.
Additionally, it’s been proven that repeat offender status reduces greatly when the families provide emotional support to their loved one, but it starts with taking care of our own.

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Discussion